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Tuesday, 19 June 2018

Man's Best Friend – and Co-worker!

It's that time of year again – Bring Your Dog To Work Day! Of course, we encourage this year-round in our office, and there are a number of great reasons why other workplaces should follow suit ... 




It's been well researched that there are many great benefits to having a dog in your life. Dogowner.co.uk has an excellent piece on the many ways in which having a dog can be beneficial for your mental health. With a plethora of information, this blog covers a large spectrum, covering people of all ages, and an array of mental health issues. 

As Hubble & Hattie is an official sponsor for this year's Bring Your Dog To Work Day, it's only fitting that we share with you the benefits of having canine colleagues in your office!

They can keep you on your feet
Office jobs can leave you desk-bound for the majority of your day, which can have a detrimental effect on your health. Having your dog join you at work will help encourage you to get up and move around, even if it is only to take them outside to do their business. 

The best way to de-stress 
Finding those spreadsheets a nightmare to deal with? Petting or stroking a dog is one of the ultimate ways to unwind from the stress of office life, as it helps to release the feel-good hormone oxytocin. Dogs have a calming effect on those around them, so even if he's not your own, having a pup in the office can help just as much!

Dogs increase job satisfaction
There are a number of ways in which having dogs in the workplace can be beneficial not only to you, but your employer and your dog as well! If a company allows staff to bring their dog into work, they are more likely to stay in that role for longer. It's also an effective incentive to attract a younger workforce. Canine co-workers can also help boost morale and productivity, as well as improve work relationships. Your commute to work will be of benefit to your pooch, as it will help them develop their confidence in public, whilst social interaction in your workplace will exercise them mentally. 

We're not sure how many pooches will be roaming the offices of H&H HQ this Friday, but Jude will be providing doggie day-care for Bonnie and we hope that Kevin's trusty companion, Indie, will be with us.

L-R: Bonnie and Indie


Some great pics from previous Bring Your Dog To Work Days!

L-R: Jeff & Solace, Paul & Olive, Lizzie & Frodo


As an official sponsor for this awesome event, we've donated to the mega prize draw! For a chance to win over £900 worth of goodies, including £50 worth of Hubble & Hattie books of your choice, all you have to do is upload your best pooch selfie to the Dog with a Job Hall of Fame on #BringYourDogToWorkDay! For more information, visit the official website. All proceeds from the day will be donated to All Dogs Matter




From all of us here at Hubble & Hattie HQ, we hope you enjoy Bring Your Dog To Work Day, and we'd love to see your pictures on our Facebook or Twitter pages, with the hashtag #BringYourDogToWorkDay


Tuesday, 12 June 2018

Canine Aggression – Rehabilitating an aggressive dog with kindness and compassion

Our second release of the year is proving a popular one.


Canine Aggression is the inspirational story of Calgacus, a dog-to-dog aggressive Bull Mastiff, and first-time dog owner Tracey McLennan. Learning how to understand Calgacus and encouraging him to direct his own learning alongside clicker training, TTouch, trick training, and lots of fun, allowed him to conquer his issues, and find joy in playing with other dogs. 

Described as "a vital resource for dog owners with problematic dogs" (Pet Owners Association), it's easy to see why this book has been eagerly anticipated, and a popular seller already!

If you're local to the Linlithgow area, and were one of the lucky few who managed to grab a ticket for this now sold-out event, Friday the 15th of June sees a fundraiser for Paws for Progress, in which Tracey and a number of top dog experts will be in attendance, talking about all-things training. The event is also acting as a book launch for Canine Aggression, with copies available to purchase on the night – you can even get them signed! All proceeds from this event will be donated to Paws for Progress, to help the company continue its wonderful work. 

In amongst planning events – as more are in the works due to the popularity of the first – Tracey has also been working on her own online dog training business, geared towards those who have read the book and wish to learn more; it's called Best Dog Learning and Stuff Ltd.


Having all of the required qualifications – a BSc (Hons) in Canine Behaviour and Training, an MA (Hons) in Philosophy, a qualified Telling TTouch practitioner as well as a member of the UK TTouch Guild of Practitioners – combined with the glowing reviews that Canine Aggression has been receiving, it's no wonder that Tracey's next venture was to start her own dog training business. You can read a snippet of what Best Dog Learning and Stuff Ltd is all about, direct from Tracey's website, below: 

"I first experienced how powerfully online communities can help when I found myself caring for a Bull Mastiff who was aggressive towards other dogs. I had no idea what to do to help him and was struggling to find in-person help with him. I found help and support on internet forums and this was so powerful that it helped me to find ways that helped my dog. Not only that – many of the people I met that way continue to be valued friends over a decade later. 
"I have a passion for problem solving and have been lucky enough to share my life with dogs who prove to have challenges in one way or another. I have worked to help my dogs through issues such as dog-to-dog aggression, resource-guarding between dogs, high prey drive and separation anxiety." 
Best Dog Learning & Stuff Ltd is still under development, however be sure to keep an eye out on the Canine Aggression Facebook page for more updates!

Canine Aggression – Rehabilitating an aggressive dog with kindness and compassion is available on our website now, and be sure you have subscribed to our newsletter Animal Magic for more updates on Best Dog Learning and Stuff Ltd.




Friday, 1 June 2018

French Bulldogs

With their friendly personalities, and small but adorable stature, it's easy to see why French Bulldogs are on course to become the most popular dog breed by the end of the year – overtaking the UK's current favourite, the loveable Labrador Retriever. But there's more to these pups, and important aspects that you need to be aware of before deciding whether or not to give one a home. 


Due to their genetic makeup, French Bulldogs are prone to a number of health problems, with most linked to how they are bred. Their squashed-up noses may look cute, but this is technically a genetic deformity, and contributes to breathing problems, slobbering, and flatulence – as short-faced breeds gulp air when they eat. Their respiratory problems can be more evident during hot weather, and they tend to overheat quickly, possibly resulting in heatstroke, During cold weather, there respiratory problems can cause dehydration of the nasal passages.



Due to their dwarf legs and long back, roughly one in three French Bulldogs suffer from malformed hip or knee joints, leading to early arthritis, or a malformed vertebrae, which can cause pain or even paralysis.

A study by the Royal Veterinary College, London, highlights ear infections, diarrhoea, conjunctivitis, and skin problems as the most common issues presenting in Frenchies. Furthermore, it appears that males tend to be less healthy than females.

"While it's a lovely breed, it is very unwise to buy one simply because of a cute appearance or its fashionable appeal. Anyone doing so could inadvertently be contributing to an impending welfare crisis," says Caroline Kisko, Kennel Club secretary



Frenchies are incredibly easy going and make for affectionate companions. They love to play games and are fairly quiet but may be stubborn, and will require consistent training for the first few months.

So, before you go looking for the perfect French Bulldog, make sure you are fully clued up on all of the possible health problems that he or she may suffer from. And remember: adopt, don't shop!